Logo-Tagline-Protect-Our-Oceans

New South Wales

Camping chairs & bean bag balls found their final destination

201602 Oyster bargeOnce again, the big oysters barge was of good use when eight tough Green Army volunteers and staff from the Gosford Council joined Clean4Shore to tackle muddy mangroves, bulky rubbish and a pile of bean bag balls that had to be cleaned up in the Empire Bay Wetlands in NSW.

What people dump there would be enough to fill a house: Amongst oyster products, poly pipes, lounge cushions, foam mattresses, timber stairs, a trampoline frame, water drums, deck chairs and countless tyres were removed from this worn down site - not to forget the pile of the before mentioned styrofoam balls that were probably the item with the highest possibility of getting mistaken for food and eaten by wild animals.

In total 1.4 tonnes of rubbish were hauled through knee deep water onto the barge to take back to the council truck. Clean-ups are a tricky undertaking when your activity is ruled by tides and the site tricky to access. Great effort by the crew to not shy away from these obstacles and make removing the rubbish a priority!

Oyster barge on rubbish mission

oyster bargeOnce again the oyster barge was put to good use: Eight volunteers from Telstra via Corporate Care got their hands dirty and pulled whooping 3 metric tons of derelict oyster products from Fox Bay in northern NSW. The keen helpers had to push the barge through the mud to load it with thousands of oyster sticks, a car bonnet, outdoor tables and boat decking. 70 plastic sheets were buried in the mud and required everyone's muscles to be pulled out, whilst stacking all that timber on the barge proved to be an advanced Tetris task. Assisted by a big crane the heavy load was later stacked on land for disposal by the National Parks. It was thanks to funding from the NSW Fisheries, Clean4shore and Corporate Landcare that this event could be pulled off. In about 2 weeks the group are planning on removing the outstanding 3 tons of rubbish from the same location.

Goodbye, dumpsite!

2101510 INGSix volunteers of ING DIRECT had their first experience of cleaning up their environment and were thrown into the deep end: Kincumber Creek in NSW had accumulated huge piles of dumped litter and debris from the oyster industry and residents alike - a pontoon, car tyres, plastic piping, household rubbish, an old TV - you name it. Thanks to the funding from Corporate Landcare, a big oyster barge for the day and the Gosford Council tip truck, the rubbish could get removed from the shore and taken to the tip a part of the Clean4Shore program!

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Beach clean-up of a different kind

201510 Clean4ShoreEleven volunteers of "The Glen" and Macmasters Beach SLSC took action through the Clean4Shore program: Not to fill clean-up bags with the usual plastic bottles and cigarette butts, but to make 6-8 tonnes of dumped oyster products disappear from Fox Bay in NSW. On 60 short metres of beach three giant piles of tar covered hardwood, metal drums, plastic oyster mesh, gas bottles, car tyres, boat hull parts and shade cloth were waiting for the right opportunity to be relocated from the coast to their more natural habitat - the Woy Woy tip.

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International Coastal Clean Up Day

201509 ICCSaturday morning at Manly Cove was a rockin’ success! Tangaroa Blue Foundation joined Manly Sea Life Sanctuary in their International Coastal Clean Up Day, kicking the school holidays off with a great start.

The 250 metre beach was filled with volunteers joining together to beachcomb Manly Cove, removing any debris in their path. The major pollutants were found to be micro plastics – with over 800 pieces collected!

Next on the list of yucky pollutants were cigarette butts, with over 700 collected! Single-use plastic food packaging followed on the list with over 523 plastic wraps, containers and packets collected, and this number doesn’t even include the 41 plastic bags collected as well. The last, but certainly not least major category represented was straws, with over 280 straws removed from just this 250 metre beach.

Manly Cove is now much safer for marine life and cleaner for residents and visitors to enjoy safely! What an awesome day of effort we had, many hands certainly made for light work. Thanks to all who helped make the day a success!